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Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2011 4:22 am
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Post Posted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 1:06 am 
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tgford58 wrote:
Yup. What Mr Warner says. It is the challenge that delights.


Here's another vote for the fix. I'd do a practice run on similar material first.

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Joined: Tue Jun 12, 2012 1:13 am
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Post Posted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 3:48 am 
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Thanks for the feedback. I was hoping that someone would say something more certain like the repair is routine or that it is normally not attempted on the stainless frames because it usually does not hold up. The material is probably a 400 series stainless. I will research a little more before any welding attempt.
In response to Greg….I did use gauge blocks to prevent over peening and got the fit exactly what I needed but I probably went about ¼ in. too far up the rail. I will make mental note for next time peen less length of the rear rails.
l am a bit broken hearted because I have a lot of time in this 1911. I have undercut the trigger guard, added a mag well, fit a new bushing, deep set crowned the barrel, changed the slide stop, changed the thumb safety, tuned the grip safety, changed the grips, serrated the slide, and spent hours de-burring, polishing, etc. I cannot even remember all the little things that I have done. I have been doing a little at a time for the last couple of years. You guys know the drill. My next thing was going to be something that I had not attempted before and that was tightening up the slide fit and re-fit the barrel. When it all goes well a gem of a 1911 develops in front of your eyes. This part of the project did not go well :cry:
At this point I am need to decide to do the repair and see how the frame holds up or replace the frame and I can use the other good parts. This 1911 is 9MM so I need to either get a frame for a ramped barrel or I will need to learn to machine the ramp slot. Anyone have a spare stainless government size frame to sell?

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Joined: Wed Feb 23, 2011 5:28 am
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Post Posted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 6:25 am 
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Rs...
I have been watching this thread..
One question..did you use a hammer or a polished punch to strike the rails??
Reason I ask is, the punch gives much better control, directs to force more accurately, requires less force to do the same amount of work.. and minimizes the chance of cracking.

Jerry

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Joined: Tue Jun 12, 2012 1:13 am
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Post Posted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 6:43 pm 
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Jerry, I used a polished hammer and gage blocks to control the amount of closure on the rails. My technical guide was Jerry Kuhhausen and Patrick Sweeny books. I purposefully struck the rails up to the mag well in the rear as I was trying to size down the specified 3/4in distance from the end of the rail. That led me to strike just past the beginning of the mag well with a portion of the hammer head when doing the rear of the rails. You should be able to see the struck area in the pic. From what I am reading here, I should have stopped shorter or not tried to size down a full ¾ in.
I considered making a swage tool or punch from an old boring bar to do the peen down and will try that next time. I did not over bend the rail for the desired fit and had actually reached the gap that I wanted when the rail cracked. Pushed it .001 too far I guess.
Another note is that this slide to frame fit was pretty sloppy. I had to take .004 off the bottom of the slide to true up the lumps and twist. The slide land measured from .110 to .108 with a small twist. The slide land was only .104” after milling. This was under common print tolerance, but I did not know the max allowable movement for peening the rails. I moved the rails down about .012” (using gage blocks as a guide) to close up the gap. Perhaps this was excessive and should not have been attempted. You guys would know better than I how much you usually close up the rails. Maybe I should have welded up the frame and re-cut the rails. I was not eager to weld the stainless for fear of other problems.
Hind sight is 20/20 as they say. Maybe my project was doomed from the start because of the sloppy original parts. The 1911 was a Springfield Loaded model made in Brazil. They were a little sloppy with the tolerances.

Richard

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Post Posted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 7:40 pm 
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Here's a pic of my old swaging punch.. It has a polished, radius face. It enables precise direction of the force. When the force is over the 90 degree inside corner under the rail, cracks are inevitable. The small face of the punch easily moves the outer edge of the rail with concentrated force over a smaller area.. The job is much easier, requires less brute force, and leaves a professional appearing finish, opposed to hammer strikes.
Image
Since most rail swagers are slide squeezers, I thought I'd show how to do it in a controlled fashion.. Simply set a dial indicator and refer to it, as opposed to using the "feel" of vise handle pressure. Go slowly, as in a few thousandths at a time. When I was squeezing slides, I fortunately never broke a slide.. But maybe I was lucky. It has been years since I swaged and squeezed, I don't and won't do it now. The whole process is archaic...
Image

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Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2011 2:45 pm
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Location: Florida and Alabama

Post Posted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 8:03 pm 
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Jerry Keefer wrote:
... When I was squeezing slides, I fortunately never broke a slide.. But maybe I was lucky. It has been years since I swaged and squeezed, I don't and won't do it now. The whole process is archaic...


I think that this is the important take-away lesson for future reference. If pros like Jerry won't do it...............

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Post Posted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 2:14 am 
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Thanks Jerry. This is great information and pictures. I can apply this concept next time, if there is a next time. You comment about you do not do this and it is archaic. If you do not peen and squeeze, what do you do to tighten the slide to frame fit?

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Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2012 1:29 am
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Location: Lubbock, Tx

Post Posted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 3:05 am 
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Most guys like Jerry tig weld and remachine.

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Post Posted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 3:12 am 
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Scotgolf2003 wrote:
Most guys like Jerry tig weld and remachine.

Tig works well.
But, I personally favor Krieger Rails..
Jerry

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Joined: Tue Feb 22, 2011 11:29 pm
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Location: Mass.

Post Posted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 4:28 am 
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Jerry Keefer wrote:
Scotgolf2003 wrote:
Most guys like Jerry tig weld and remachine.

Tig works well.
But, I personally favor Krieger Rails..
Jerry



Myself, I would rather start with an oversized frame and slide. More control.

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