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Joined: Sat Mar 12, 2011 5:16 am
Posts: 820
Location: Eastern Iowa

Post Posted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 8:48 pm 
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.......... ;-)

Just like that.....

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Director
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Joined: Wed Feb 23, 2011 5:28 am
Posts: 1230

Post Posted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 1:03 am 
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My solution to this operation...
I use a .062 center cutting end mill to cut the slot. The standoff and set screws keep pressure on the ejector to insure positive pin engagement/frame position.
Jerry
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Joined: Sat Feb 26, 2011 4:42 am
Posts: 330
Location: North Carolina

Post Posted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 5:40 am 
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Oh Jerry, you're so.....brilliant! I love seeing machines at work.

I think seeing a setup, for whatever it may be, helps the most.

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Frank Ramsden

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Joined: Thu Oct 25, 2012 11:31 pm
Posts: 10

Post Posted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 3:31 pm 
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Thanks for that picture, Jerry. It's nice to see the tools of the trade. BTW, is there anything under that square washer protecting the frame, or is the square washer a softer alloy, etc?

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Joined: Wed Feb 23, 2011 5:28 am
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Post Posted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 5:01 pm 
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lbmcse wrote:
BTW, is there anything under that square washer protecting the frame, or is the square washer a softer alloy, etc?

Not on that frame.. It is new in the white, and will be prepped and polished later. On frames/slides that I want to protect, and avoid marking or marring, I cut strips from 3X5 cards to place under or over the clamps and or paralells.
It doe not take much pressure to stabilize the frame..
Jerry

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Joined: Tue Feb 22, 2011 11:29 pm
Posts: 647
Location: Mass.

Post Posted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 5:42 pm 
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What do you think about the LH twist on the 1/16th drill ? I've been holding the ejector and using a 1/16 from the other side, but fear someday of breaking one off.

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Greg Derr
www.Derrprecision.com

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Joined: Thu Oct 25, 2012 11:31 pm
Posts: 10

Post Posted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 6:00 pm 
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Greg Derr wrote:
What do you think about the LH twist on the 1/16th drill ? I've been holding the ejector and using a 1/16 from the other side, but fear someday of breaking one off.


The LH twist allows more of the hole to be used as a guide. That length holds the drill bit better (when doing this by hand) in position for placement of the cutout on the stud; and IMO probably better distributes the camming exerted by the bit onto the frame (less ovaling of portions of the hole).


Last edited by lbmcse on Sat Nov 17, 2012 9:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: Sat Feb 19, 2011 8:38 pm
Posts: 1421
Location: SC

Post Posted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 7:13 pm 
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I can tell you from experience that a 1/16" carbide end mill is very easy to break off in the hole!

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Dave Berryhill
Berryhill Custom Guns, LLC

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Joined: Wed Feb 23, 2011 5:28 am
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Post Posted: Sun Nov 18, 2012 12:18 am 
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Greg Derr wrote:
What do you think about the LH twist on the 1/16th drill ?

Hi Greg,
I am not a fan of drills, right or left, it is still a drill and drills flex, tend to walk or leade off. We are asking the frame to be a drill guide, and the drill to start, feed in, and cut accurately into the radius surface of the extractor leg. That won't work well on a flat surface without a center drill spot. Drill guides have a place in industry, but they are hardened. The up side to this is, the operation of this pin/hole is not critical, and even a poorly drilled leg and enlarged hole still often works well enough. When drilling and tapping critical holes, I usually drill a small pilot hole, and finish with a specially sized center cutting endmill, for a class A square bottom hole for maximum thread depth. One other advantage to this is, should the drill flex or walk, the endmill will cut on the spindle center line and correct an off center hole.
Whether using a drill or endmill, using the quill stop, and pecking to control the infeed is important to prevent breakage. Blow out the chips every other peck or so..
One time on another forum, a poster told me, "all that's needed for the extractor leg, is a Black&Decker portable drill and a 1/16 drill." He was serious..:):)
Jerry


Last edited by Jerry Keefer on Sun Nov 18, 2012 12:24 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: Tue Mar 08, 2011 6:18 pm
Posts: 268

Post Posted: Sun Nov 18, 2012 12:22 am 
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What...you mesn the good ol' hand held drill isn't optimal?

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