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Joined: Wed Feb 23, 2011 5:28 am
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Post Posted: Tue Jan 17, 2012 8:39 pm 
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ddg4238 wrote:
. I worked for an aircraft fastener manufacturer back in the 80's and 90's for 8 - 9 years, who made all types of fastners for the military and aircraft industry.


Ahhh - Hah..!! So you know about single, double, and multi station transfer parts formers...?? Very interesting/challenging, profession. It can turn your hair grey though.. 8-) 8-) 8-)
Jerry

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Post Posted: Tue Jan 17, 2012 10:53 pm 
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I think "semantics" is a word ofr a reason... why the distinction between double and multi station? Don't two stations constitute multiplicity? Not that I even know what you gents are talking about, just wondrin'... don't mind me though; curiosity killed the cat, but the cat had nine lives with which to learn and I have but one.

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-Ted King

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Post Posted: Wed Jan 18, 2012 12:09 am 
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Theory.vs.Practice wrote:
I think "semantics" is a word ofr a reason... why the distinction between double and multi station? Don't two stations constitute multiplicity? Not that I even know what you gents are talking about, just wondrin'... don't mind me though; curiosity killed the cat, but the cat had nine lives with which to learn and I have but one.

Cold heading/cold forming/trapped extrusion machines at that time were designated as single blow, single die. Then you can have a single die, double blow.
Then there were two die, four blow transfer machines, and then, the multi die ( 4-6 -8 etc. die ) parts formers. Most skilled machine operators were almost always guaranteed a lifetime of employment, due to the complexity of the skill.
Jerry

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Post Posted: Wed Jan 18, 2012 12:18 am 
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Mr. Keefer,

I am incredibly interested in the formation of usable metal devices from raw material; I am even more incredibly uninformed. I am, in fact, quite without credibility: I have no idea what you have just said, at all.

I plan to continue trying, however.

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-Ted King

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Post Posted: Wed Jan 18, 2012 12:21 am 
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Oh! I think that I might sorta get it, maybe...

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-Ted King

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Joined: Wed Feb 23, 2011 12:11 am
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Post Posted: Wed Jan 18, 2012 12:54 am 
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Think cold forged to finish dimensions.

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Post Posted: Wed Jan 18, 2012 1:13 am 
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pistolwrench wrote:
I recall doing a similar install way back in the spring of 1986.
Yup, last century........ the previous millenia.

:D


1986, huh, Chuckster? So back in your mid 60s??? Image

  

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Post Posted: Wed Jan 18, 2012 1:55 am 
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Theory.vs.Practice wrote:
Mr. Keefer,

I am incredibly interested in the formation of usable metal devices from raw material; I am even more incredibly uninformed. I am, in fact, quite without credibility: I have no idea what you have just said, at all.

I plan to continue trying, however.

Coiled wire, or rod is drawn into the machine, which cuts off a specific length and cold forms it into a part. Extrusion reduces the diameter, such as a screw or bolt tenon, and then forms the head to the desired shape. Round, square, hex, etc.
Some machine are enormous in size. The operator walks/stands on a catwalk, and the tooling is handled with an over head gib crane. At that time National and Waterbury Farrell were the common standard machine. The more complex the part, the more sophisticated machine. These machines are basically the same style used to make cartridge cases...
Jerry

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Joined: Fri Apr 29, 2011 8:18 am
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Post Posted: Wed Jan 18, 2012 6:43 am 
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Personally I think sleepy is fairly fortunate to have things occupying his time. I mean.... It could be worse. He could be sitting at home photoshopping American Hangunner covers due to jealousy.

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Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2011 6:05 pm
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Location: East Tennessee

Post Posted: Thu Jan 19, 2012 1:26 am 
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Jerry, I knew exactly what you meant about cold forming, I recently toured a plant where I was applying for a job. They hot form automotive valves from steel wire. It was very interesting to see all the machinery from the '80s or earlier they had. What really got me was the thread rolling machines they were using to straighten out the valve stems after forming the tulip end, I had never considered a thread roller could be used for that.

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