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Joined: Wed Feb 23, 2011 3:33 am
Posts: 38

Post Posted: Wed Feb 23, 2011 4:44 am 
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I've had my M14 for a few years now and love this rifle. I like it's heritage (Garand), it's cartridge (7.62 NATO) and it's timeless profile. The M14 shares a few common threads with our beloved 1911. They are both criticized by some as a throw back to and older generation when it was steel and wood that got the job done rather than polymer. They both benefit from a competent smith and really shine when worked over by a pro. They come in big boy calibers and use steel magazines. They also both require their end user to be a bit of armorer themselves and with most folks not willing or being unaware of this, they can develop a reputation for inaccuracy or un-reliability.

Another common trait is that that really have potential when modernized. Take the 1911 for example. With a plethora of finishes, options, and attachments they can really get the job done. Just look at pistolwrenches "Sandbox Model" and tell me that's not a 1911 for the 21st century.

The M14 has a few modern tricks up it's sleeve too. With more than a few aluminum chaises available from Sage Int, Troy Industries and JAE Enterprises they can really take the guess work and voodoo out of the old war horse. These are great rigs and really ring out the accuracy potential of the gun. I went with another option, a blending of old and new. I choose the Vltor Modstock. This unit is a original USGI fiberglass stock with the addition of a collapsible stock and pistol grip. The stock is adjustable for length of pull and comb height.

To ride in the stock I choose a LRB arms M25 receiver and a 18.5" chrome molly barrel. A word about LRB arms. They make their forged receivers in the good ol' USA and have a excellent reputation for the quality of their products. The 18.5" barrel is a modern upgrade to the old 22" of the original and makes the gun handier and lighter. All the parts are original USGI, Sadlak and LRB. This gun was built by a M14 armorer in Columbus N.C. named Jon Wolfe.

Initially, I had the gun built and put around 500 rounds through it before I settled on some upgrades. I just got it back this week after Jon worked it over. He bedded it, shimmed the gas system, stiffened the forend, added a "grippier" texture to the forend, and duracoated the stock in a flat desert tan. When I picked it up we had time to go to the range and test the accuracy out. All we had to use for a scope was a 10 year old Burris 2.5x10 and here's the real kicker, the rear scope ring was broken so we could only attach it by the front one. After setting up and getting some rounds downrange to zero the rifle and get it settled into the stock we shot some vintage M118 from 79'. We shot at 300 yards with a slight cross wind. The rifle printed 4"-6" groups which was fine by me. I can't wait to see what it will do with some quality glass.

Anyway, I just wanted to post this up because as I said the M14 shares some common traits with the subject of this forum and I thought it warranted posting.

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Joined: Sat Feb 19, 2011 8:38 pm
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Post Posted: Wed Feb 23, 2011 2:34 pm 
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There is an article in the new issue of American Rifleman about the U.S. military using modified versions of the M14. It's a little light on technical info but still an interesting read.

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Joined: Wed Feb 23, 2011 11:40 pm
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Post Posted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 1:32 am 
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I'll have my scout squad in .308 on of these days. I love the M14/M1. I'm more of the wood and steel type, but I do like what you did with yours. Let us know how it shoots when you get the good glass up and running.

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Post Posted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 1:51 am 
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Yeah, I'd love to find a way to solidly bed the action without doing all the National Match hocus pocus. The article in American Rifleman touched on it but I'd love to see some more technical info on how to do it.

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Dave Berryhill
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Joined: Wed Feb 23, 2011 3:33 am
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Post Posted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 7:11 am 
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Dave,

My smith does what he calls a GI bedding (his term, not technical). He beds the action but doesn't do it as extensively a you would for a full match build. This allows an improvement over a non bedded stock because you can set proper front band tension and give more shot to shot consistency over non-bedded. Also you don't have to worry as much about removing the action from the stock since it's not a match rifle making normal cleaning easier and less worrisome.

He also coats the for-end in the same material used for the bedding (possibly marine-Tex) to add stiffness and resist flex then duracoats. What your left with is a utility rifle with better then average M1A accuracy.

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Post Posted: Fri Mar 04, 2011 3:07 am 
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For anyone who may be interested in more technical info on "GI" bedding check this thread out. It is by my m14 smith John and it explains it in much greater detail.

http://m14tfl.com/upload/showthread.php?t=95317

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Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2011 5:14 am
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Location: Sweet Home Alabama

Post Posted: Fri Mar 04, 2011 3:22 am 
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I have no idea how they were put together, accurized, or otherwise refurbished but on my last two deployments all of our light platoons had at least two designated marksmen using USGI M14s with Leupold or Unertl optics. I've shot them a few times. They're fabulous weapons but heavy as hell.

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Post Posted: Fri Apr 15, 2011 3:29 pm 
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Guys, if I may offer a suggestion. M1As are just like Garands in that if you have a good, tight stock-fit(Either bedded or just well-inletted) try to remove the action as little as possible. When I took the Maint.course at Lackland for the AFPG M1 Match-Rifle, the main thing they hammered into us was that the action should only be removed from from the Buttstock once a year for a thorough cleaning. with these Wood-N-Steel wonders the fit of the Stock is about 75% of the accuracy-level. It's all about consistant operation from one round to the next.

The beauty of these converted Battlerifles is that for normal cleaning all you need to do is chuck them upside-down in a Cleaning Vise(I use a Lohmann) with the bolt open and clean the bore and chamber and regrease. The reason for cleaning upside-down is to keep solvent out of the Gas-Cylinder.

Josh, I hauled a TRW M14 along with ten magazines through the Bush for almost a year and I weighed a whopping 145 pounds at the time. You get used to it fast, especially when you see how effective it is.

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Post Posted: Fri Apr 15, 2011 4:33 pm 
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Dave B wrote:
There is an article in the new issue of American Rifleman about the U.S. military using modified versions of the M14. It's a little light on technical info but still an interesting read.


We had one in my small team in A'stan. Basic M-14 with a Leuopold scope. This was before the full on press to do the conversions to DMR rifles that they are referring to in the article. It was very effective. Just sitting on the roof of my team house, I could glass the punks setting up to rocket the FOB down the road. I don't think they ever figured out how the counter battery fire arrived BEFORE they got a round off at the FOB. :twisted: :lol:

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Post Posted: Sun Jul 10, 2011 4:32 am 
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I've been wanting to get a semi auto "just in case/one gun" rifle...I don't want the AR stigma living here in CA and .308>.5.56, so I'm thinking about one of these. Wood furniture, set up like a hunting rifle with maybe a holo sight on top of the scope should be good I think. Only downsides I see are cost of ammo and weight. I would use it for hunting regularly of course to keep familiar. Input? I'm a stickler for accuracy and hope to learn to shoot longish ranges.

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